PVC vs CPVC: What’s the Difference? [Detailed Comparison]

PVC and CPVC are two types of pipes that many people confuse with one another. The truth is, they’re not the same at all. They’re both made from plastics, but PVC is a much more durable material than CPVC and has different applications as well.

In this detailed article, we’ll go over the differences between PVC vs CPVC piping materials in detail so you can make an informed decision before using either one for your plumbing needs.

What Is PVC?

PVC, or polyvinyl chloride, is a type of plastic that’s been used for plumbing and piping since the 1950s. PVC is made from oil and natural gas, so it’s a non-renewable resource.

It’s also one of the most durable types of plastics available, making it perfect for use in plumbing applications. PVC pipes are less likely to burst or leak than other types of pipes, and they’re easy to install and maintain.

One downside to PVC is that it can’t be recycled, so once it’s used, it ends up in landfills. However, because PVC is such a durable material, it usually lasts many years before needing to be replaced.

If you’re looking for a sturdy plumbing material that won’t easily burst or leak, PVC is the way to go. It’s perfect for use in both residential and commercial applications.

It’s a non-toxic material, so you won’t have to worry about it contaminating your water supply. It’s also been found to be safe for use with drinking water.

PVC is easy to cut and install in most cases, especially when compared to other types of plastic piping materials such as CPVC or ABS pipe.

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What Is CPVC?

CPVC, or chlorinated polyvinyl chloride, is a type of plastic that was first introduced in the 1960s. It’s made from PVC resin and chlorine gas, so it’s not a renewable resource.

CPVC is less durable than PVC and has a shorter lifespan. It also doesn’t handle heat as well as PVC, meaning it’s not ideal for use in hot water applications.

One benefit of CPVC is that it’s more affordable than PVC pipe. It also doesn’t corrode like metal pipes can, making it a good choice for areas with high levels of moisture.

If you’re looking for affordable plumbing material that won’t corrode over time, CPVC may be the right option for you. However, it’s not as durable as PVC and shouldn’t be used in applications where the piping will be exposed to high levels of heat.

CPVC is also more difficult to cut and install than PVC, so if you’re inexperienced with plumbing, you may want to opt for PVC instead.

In conclusion, both PVC and CPVC have their own unique benefits and drawbacks. It ultimately comes down to what your specific needs are and which material would best suit them.

If you’re still unsure which type of plastic pipe is right for you, contact a professional plumber for assistance. They’ll be able to help you decide based on the specifics of your project.

CPVC Fittings Vs PVC Fittings

CPVC and PVC fittings are both made from plastic, but they’re not the same. CPVC fittings are made from CPVC pipe, while PVC fittings are made from PVC pipe.

CPVC fittings are less durable than PVC fittings and should only be used in applications where the piping will not be exposed to high levels of heat. PVC fittings are more durable and can be used in a wider range of applications.

If you’re unsure which type of fitting is right for your project, contact a professional plumber for assistance. They’ll be able to help you decide based on the specifics of your application.

PVC vs CPVC: Important Differences

Size Differences

PVC and CPVC are both available in a range of standard sizes. However, the actual dimensions can vary depending on whether you’re working with PVC or CPVC pipes.

The chart below lists common types of PVC and CPVC piping along with their corresponding inside diameter (ID) and outside diameter (OD).

Pipe Type: Inside Diameter: Outside Diameter:

  • CPVC Sch 40 Pipe 0.75″ – 0.90″ 11/16″ – 15/16″
  • CPVC 80 PSI Pipe 0.675″-0.810 13/16″-15/16″”
  • MDPE 100 PSI Pipe 0 .600 “-0 .770 ” ⅝ ” – ⅞ “
  • PVC Sch 40 Pipe 0.78″ -0.82″ 15/16″-⅝””
  • PVC 80 PSI Pipe 0.66″ -0 .74 ¾ “– 11 / 16 “”

Size is just one difference between PVC and CPVC pipes. If you’re having trouble deciding which type of piping material to use, contact a professional plumber for assistance based on the specifics of your project.

They’ll be able to help determine if PVC or CPVC better fits your needs depending on the size and other requirements specified by your application.”

Color Differences

PVC and CPVC pipes come in a variety of colors, but the colors may vary depending on the manufacturer. The most common colors for both types of piping are white and gray, but you can also find black, brown, and green PVC and CPVC pipes.

The color of your piping material doesn’t have any bearing on its performance or durability. However, it can be helpful to choose a specific color based on the application you’re using it for.

For example, if you’re using PVC or CPVC for plumbing applications in a home renovation project, white or gray piping may be a better choice, so it blends in with the walls and ceilings.

If you’re unsure which color is best for your project, contact a professional plumber for assistance. They’ll be able to help you decide based on the specifics of your application.

As mentioned earlier, there are distinct differences between PVC and CPVC pipes that affect how they can be used in plumbing applications.

If you’re still unsure which type of plastic piping is right for you, contact a licensed plumber for further information or assistance with your project today.

Temperature Threshold

CPVC and PVC pipes have different temperature thresholds that they can withstand before breaking. CPVC piping is able to handle higher temperatures than PVC, making it a better choice for applications where the piping will be exposed to high levels of heat.

If you’re unsure if CPVC or PVC is suitable for your project, contact a professional plumber for assistance. They’ll be able to help you decide based on the specifics of your application.

Both types of plastic piping have their own unique benefits and drawbacks. It ultimately comes down to what your specific needs are and which material would best suit them.

If you’re still unsure which type of plastic pipe is right for you, contact a plumber today! They’ll be able to help you decide based on the specifics of your application.

Chemical Compatibility

Both PVC and CPVC piping are resistant to a variety of chemicals, but it’s important not to mix the two types.

PVC is compatible with acetylene, carbon dioxide, ethyl chloride gas, freon-12 (carbon tetrachloride), methyl bromide gas, or liquid propane (butane). It can also be used in applications where you’ll come in contact with gasoline and oils without suffering any adverse effects.

CPVC is compatible with chlorine water and brine; caustic soda; hydrochloric acid solutions; hydrogen peroxide up to 110°F; sodium hydroxide solution above 120°F up to 160°F for 30 minutes maximum at 70 psi pressure differential.

In addition, CPVC can be used in applications where you’ll come into contact with gasoline and oils without suffering any adverse effects.

Contact a professional plumber for assistance if you’re unsure about whether or not to use PVC or CPVC piping for your project.

They’ll be able to help determine which material is right based on the specifics of your application.

Final Words

PVC vs CPVC has a lot of differences, but the most important one is their temperature tolerance. PVC can be used in applications with high heat that would break down other types of piping materials.

In general, it’s best to use this material for plumbing projects where you don’t want your pipes to become brittle from extreme temperatures.

If you’re unsure which type of plastic pipe is right for your project, contact a professional plumber today! They’ll be able to help you decide based on the specifics of your application.”